William & Mary
Jeffrey Bellin

Jeffrey Bellin

University Professor for Teaching Excellence
Degrees: J.D., Stanford Law School; B.A., Columbia University
Email: [[jbellin]]
Office phone: (757) 221-7364
Office location: Room 210
Areas of Specialization

Constitutional Law--4th, 5th, 6th Amendments; Criminal Law; Criminal Procedure Law; Evidence; Law and Technology

Teaching Interests

Evidence; Criminal Procedure; Criminal Law; Criminal Justice Seminar

Representative Professional Activities and Achievements

Jeffrey Bellin received his undergraduate degree from Columbia University (summa cum laude) and his law degree from Stanford Law School (order of the coif). After graduating from law school, Professor Bellin clerked for the Honorable Merrick Garland of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Following his clerkship, Professor Bellin served as a prosecutor with the United States Attorney’s Office in Washington, D.C., practiced with the San Diego office of Latham & Watkins, and served as a senior attorney for the California Courts of Appeal.

In 2017, Professor Bellin was named a University Professor for Teaching Excellence upon the recommendation of a College-wide faculty search committee. He received the Walter Williams Memorial Teaching Award from the 2014 graduating class. Professor Bellin has also been awarded a Plumeri Award for Faculty Excellence (2015), and Cabell Research Professorships in 2015-16 and 2016-17. Prior to joining the William & Mary faculty, Professor Bellin taught at the Southern Methodist University School of Law, where the 2012 graduating class awarded him the Don Smart Award for Excellence in Teaching.

In recent years, Professor Bellin has been called upon by the federal courts to investigate allegations of misconduct against federal judges. His report on one recent investigation formed the basis for a published opinion in a particularly high-profile case. See In re Charges of Judicial Misconduct, 769 F.3d 762 (D.C. Cir. 2014).

Professor Bellin’s legal writing is regularly cited in federal and state judicial opinions and scholarly commentary. He also contributes to the media, appearing frequently on Bloomberg Law Radio and Hearsay with Cathy Lewis (NPR). His commentary has been featured in numerous other media outlets, including CNN, ABC, USA Today, NPR, and the Washington Post.

In the News
  • Op-ed, The Limits of Prosecutorial Power, The Marshall Project, May 2, 2017. Online.
  • Op-ed, 'Serial' Should Release Bergdahl Interviews, USA Today, Aug. 30, 2016. Online.
  • Op-ed, Does the 'McConnell Principle' make sense?, CNN.com, Apr. 12, 2016. Online.
  • Op-ed, The Right Justice for a Divided Country, CNN.com, Mar. 18, 2016. Online.
  • Op-ed, How the Supreme Court can change politics as usual, Washington Post, Jan. 21, 2016. Online.
  • For additional recent press interviews or Op-eds, click here.


    Scholarly Publications
    Books
    • Hearsay, vol. 30B, in Federal Practice & Procedure (Thomson Reuters 2017) (with Charles A. Wright).
    • The Virginia and Federal Rules of Evidence: A Concise Comparison with Commentary (2015). Online.
    Articles
    • Reassessing Prosecutorial Power Through the Lens of Mass Incarceration, 116 Mich. L. Rev. ___ (forthcoming 2017). SSRN.
    • The Silence Penalty, 103 Iowa L. Rev. ___ (forthcoming 2017). SSRN.
    • The Right to Remain Armed, 93 Washington Univ. L. Rev. 1 (2015). SSRN.
    • Trial by Google: Judicial Notice in the Information Age, 108 Nw. U. L. Rev. 1137 (2014) (with Andrew Ferguson). SSRN.
    • Attorney Competence in an Age of Plea Bargaining and Econometrics, 12 Ohio St. J. Crim. L. 153 (2014). SSRN.
    • The Inverse Relationship between the Constitutionality and Effectiveness of New York City 'Stop and Frisk', 94 B.U. L. Rev. 1495 (2014). SSRN.
    • eHearsay, 98 Minn. L. Rev. 7 (2013). SSRN.
    • Facebook, Twitter, and the Uncertain Future of Present Sense Impressions, 160 U. Pa. L. Rev. 331 (2012). SSRN.
    • The Incredible Shrinking Confrontation Clause, 92 B.U. L. Rev. 1865 (2012). SSRN.
    • Crime-Severity Distinctions and the Fourth Amendment: Reassessing Reasonableness in a Changing World, 97 Iowa L. Rev. 1 (2011). SSRN.
    • Widening Batson's Net to Ensnare More Than the Unapologetically Bigoted or Painfully Unimaginative Attorney, 96 Cornell L. Rev. 1075 (2011) (with Junichi Semitsu). SSRN.
    • Is Punishment Relevant After All? A Prescription for Informing Juries of the Consequences of Conviction, 90 B.U. L. Rev. 2223 (2010). SSRN.
    • Reconceptualizing the Fifth Amendment Prohibition of Adverse Comment on Criminal Defendants' Trial Silence, 71 Ohio St. L.J. 229 (2010). SSRN.
    • Circumventing Congress: How the Federal Courts Opened the Door to Impeaching Criminal Defendants with Prior Convictions, 42 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 289 (2008). SSRN.
    • Improving the Reliability of Criminal Trials Through Legal Rules that Encourage Defendants to Testify, 76 U. Cin. L. Rev. 851 (2008). SSRN.
    • The Significance (if Any) for the Federal Criminal Justice System of Advances in Lie Detector Technology, 80 Temp. L. Rev. 711 (2007). SSRN.
    Other
    • Justice for the 1 Percent, Salon.com, Sept. 18, 2015 (op-ed). Online.
    • America's Public Corruption Problem, CNN.com, Apr. 7, 2015 (op-ed). Online.
    • A Key Lesson from the Garner and Ferguson Cases, CNN.com, Dec. 8, 2014 (op-ed). Online.
    • Presentation to the Federal Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Evidence, 83 Fordham L. Rev. 1163, 1205 (2014) (Transcript of Remarks).
    • What the McDonnell Verdict Says About U.S. Politics, Washington Post, Sept. 5, 2014 (op-ed). Online.
    • The Case for eHearsay, 83 Fordham L. Rev. 1317 (2014) (symposium article). SSRN.
    • Modern Justice and the Bill of Rights, Daily Press, Aug. 3, 2013 (op-ed). Online.
    • Applying Crawford's Confrontation Right in a Digital Age, 45 Tex. Tech. L. Rev. 33 (2012) (symposium article). SSRN.
    • How ‘Duty to Retreat’ Became ‘Stand Your Ground, CNN.com, Mar. 21, 2012 (op-ed). Online.

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